Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Judiciary

  • Updated

Six states are holding congressional primary elections, primary runoffs or special elections on Tuesday. Many of the Republican races will test former President Donald Trump’s national influence. Others could provide the first hints of how voters are reacting to the Supreme Court’s decision on abortion. In Colorado, Republican congresswoman Lauren Boebert is trying to beat back a challenge from a more mainstream Republican. Two Republican House incumbents in Mississippi are facing runoff primaries. In Illinois, Republican congresswoman Mary Miller is seeking a victory after calling the Supreme Court's abortion decision a “historic victory for white life." Her campaign says she meant to say a victory for the “right to life.”

  • Updated

Tuesday marks the first elections since the Supreme Court revoked a woman's constitutional right to an abortion. It's a top issue in multiple races in primaries in seven states. In Colorado, a rare Republican who supports abortion rights, Joe O'Dea, is competing for his party's U.S. Senate nomination against State Rep. Ron Hanks, who opposes the procedure. In Illinois, farmer Darren Bailey, who wants to repeal the state's guaranteed right of abortion, is the leading Republican gubernatorial candidate. Trump's election lies are also a big issue Tuesday. An indicted Colorado clerk who echoes Trump's conspiracy theories is running for the GOP nomination for Secretary of State.

Bond has been set for “Tiger King” star Bhagavan “Doc” Antle on charges he laundered more than half a million dollars. A federal judge in South Carolina on Monday set a $250,000 secured bond for Antle. Prosecutors said he would be released Tuesday and required to stay at his wildlife park near Myrtle Beach. Federal authorities say Antle and one of his employees laundered $505,000 over a four-month period by doling out checks from businesses they controlled. They each face up to 20 years in prison if convicted. Antle also faces more than a dozen charges in Virginia including animal cruelty and wildlife trafficking.

  • Updated

Facebook and Instagram have begun promptly removing posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to access them following a Supreme Court decision that stripped away constitutional protections for the procedure. Memes and status updates explained how women could legally get abortion pills in the mail. Some even offered to mail the prescriptions to women living in a state that has banned the procedure.  Facebook and Instagram responded by removing some of the posts. The platforms' parent company, Meta, said it has a policy against gifting or selling pharmaceutical drugs.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court says that a high school football coach who knelt and prayed on the field after games is protected by the Constitution. It's a decision that opponents say will open the door to “much more coercive prayer” in public schools. The court ruled 6-3 for the coach with the court’s conservative justices in the majority and its liberals in dissent. The justices in the majority emphasized that the coach’s prayer happened after the game was over. The liberal justices in the minority said there was evidence that the coach’s prayer at the 50-yard-line had a coercive effect and it let him incorporate his “personal religious beliefs into a school event.”

  • Updated

Vice President Kamala Harris has spent weeks warning that the Supreme Court decision undermining the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling could open the door for sweeping new restrictions on privacy. She argues the fallout could affect birth control, in vitro fertilization, gay marriage and that other new restrictions could affect the right to vote. The nation's first female vice president has emerged as a leading White House voice on abortion rights along with President Joe Biden. Harris' efforts on abortion rights come after she has struggled with other thorny policy problems that Biden assigned to the vice president, including immigration policy and expanding voting rights. Both issues have stalled in Congress.

  • Updated

New Mexico’s Democratic governor is taking steps to ensure safe harbor to people seeking abortions or providing abortions at health care facilities within the state. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signed an executive order Monday that rejects cooperation with other states that might interfere with abortion access in New Mexico. The order also prohibits most New Mexico state employees from assisting other states in investigating or seeking sanctions against local abortion providers. Lujan Grisham has vowed to continue legal access to abortion in New Mexico after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade decision to end constitutional protection for abortion.

  • Updated

The California Assembly has approved Texas-style lawsuits over illegal guns, mimicking the Lone Star State’s law aimed at deterring abortions. The California bill would allow anyone to sue people who sell illegal firearms. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom sought the measure in opposition to the Texas law. The California bill would automatically be invalidated if the Texas law is eventually ruled unconstitutional. The California Assembly approved the bill Monday, sending it back to the Senate for a final vote. Gun owners’ rights organizations and the American Civil Liberties Union both criticized creating a bounty to encourage people to bring civil actions to punish crimes.

  • Updated

The Biden administration has suspended an order that had focused resources for the arrest and deportation of immigrants on those considered a threat to public safety and national security. The action over the weekend followed a ruling this month from a federal judge in Texas. Advocates and experts say the move announced Saturday will only sow fear among immigrant communities. A Cornell University law professor says many immigrants will now be afraid to leave their homes out of concern they’ll be detained. President Joe Biden's order last year was a departure from former President Donald Trump’s administration, when immigration agencies were given wider latitude.

  • Updated

Arizona's Capitol is now ringed with a double row of fencing with concertina wire strung in between. The fencing was put up over the weekend as three days of protests unfolded over the U.S. Supreme Court's decision saying there is no constitutional right to have an abortion. As many as 8,000 people marched and chanted at the Capitol on Friday night and the vast majority were peaceful. But state troopers fired tear gas after a handful of protesters banged on the front glass of the state Senate and at least one person tried to kick in a sliding door. Smaller protests were held the following two days, but there were only a handful of arrests and no injuries.

  • Updated

California voters will decide in November whether to guarantee the right to an abortion in their state constitution. State lawmakers on Monday voted to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot this year. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday, which let states decide whether to allow abortion. California is run by Democrats who support abortion rights, but the legal right to an abortion in California is based on a right to privacy in the state constitution. The amendment would prevent the government from interfering with a person's right to an abortion or contraceptives.

  • Updated

The fall of Roe v. Wade shifted the battleground over abortion to courthouses around the country, as abortion foes looked to quickly enact statewide bans and the other side sought to buy more time. The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision Friday to end constitutional protections for abortion opened the gates for litigation from all sides. Much of Monday's court activity focused on “trigger laws” that were designed to go into effect when Roe v. Wade was overturned. On Monday, judges in Louisiana and Utah issued orders blocking trigger laws from going into effect. In South Carolina, a federal court ruled that a ban on abortions after six weeks of pregnancy can take effect immediately.

  • Updated

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The June 24 ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

  • Updated

Anti-abortion groups in Wisconsin say they will work with lawmakers next year to update or replace the state's 1849 abortion ban. Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Friday to strike down its decision in Roe v. Wade, some Democrats and abortion rights supporters have questioned the validity of the 173-year-old law. Abortion opponents want the Legislature to clarify and strengthen the ban in 2023 to completely ban surgical and medication abortions. Attorney General Josh Kaul has already said he will not enforce the ban and has promised to provide more information about his response later this week.

  • Updated

Kentucky’s new abortion ban is being challenged by abortion-rights supporters. They filed a lawsuit Monday saying women are being “forced to remain pregnant against their will” in violation of the state’s constitution. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron says he'll fight any “baseless claim” against the abortion ban. It takes aim at a Kentucky law halting nearly all abortions in the event the Roe v. Wade ruling were to be overturned. The law went into effect when the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday ended women’s constitutional protections for abortions. The suit asks a judge to temporarily block the so-called trigger law.

  • Updated

Reproductive health providers are asking a Florida court to block a new law from taking effect this week that would restrict abortions after 15 weeks. Planned Parenthood and other health centers were in court in Tallahassee on Monday seeking a temporary emergency injunction to stop the law. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed the 15 week abortion ban this spring. It is set to go into effect on Friday. Leon Circuit Judge John C. Cooper began hearing arguments in the case days after the U.S. Supreme Court ended federal protections for abortion by overturning the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. A decision in the Florida case is expected Thursday.

  • Updated

Hundreds of so-called crisis pregnancy centers are located across every state in the U.S. Now that the Supreme Court has ruled that states can make abortion illegal, experts say these centers are likely to redouble their efforts to persuade women not to end their pregnancies. The logistics work in their favor, since many women won’t have the legal option of abortion without leaving their state. Some 2,500 pregnancy centers are located across the country, while there are fewer than 800 abortion clinics. Often religiously affiliated, the anti-abortion centers are not licensed medical facilities and do not provide medical services such as pre- or post-natal care or other health care for uninsured women.

  • Updated

A judge has blocked New York City from letting noncitizens vote for mayor and other municipal offices. Republicans challenged the measure as unconstitutional. A Staten Island Judge agreed with the GOP in a ruling issued Monday. In January, New York became the first major U.S. city to grant widespread municipal voting rights to noncitizens, though none had cast ballots yet. The law’s supporters said it gave an electoral voice to many people who have made a home in the city and pay taxes to it but face tough paths to citizenship. City lawyers say they're considering next steps.

  • Updated

A court ruling is back in effect that blocks President Joe Biden from requiring federal employees to get vaccinated against COVID-19. A Texas-based federal judge had blocked the federal employee vaccine mandate in January. But a three-member panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled the judge didn’t have jurisdiction and that employees opposed to the mandate should have pursued civil service remedies. Now, the full 17-member 5th Circuit court has decided to take another look at the issue. That means the Texas judge’s block on the mandate remains in effect.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court has ruled for doctors who face criminal charges for overprescribing powerful pain medication, in a case arising from the opioid addiction crisis. Justice Stephen Breyer wrote for the court Monday that prosecutors must prove that doctors knew they were illegally prescribing powerful pain drugs in violation of the federal Controlled Substances Act. The ruling came as the U.S. sees record numbers of drug overdose deaths, many from the highly lethal opioid fentanyl. But the justices did not throw out the convictions of two doctors whose appeal was heard in February. Instead, it ordered federal appeals courts to take a new look at their cases.

  • Updated

Seven states are set to host primary elections Tuesday as the nation comes to terms with last week’s stunning Supreme Court ruling eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion. The slate of nominating contests could offer the first clues as to whether the political landscape has shifted. Abortion is a particularly relevant issue in Colorado, where GOP voters are deciding whether to nominate a rare pro-choice Republican in the state’s high-profile U.S. Senate contest. The primaries will also offer new insight about the state of the Republican Party. The central issue in virtually every GOP contest remains fealty to former President Donald Trump and his baseless conspiracy theories.

  • Updated

The Supreme Court has made it easier for certain prison inmates to seek shorter sentences under a bipartisan 2018 federal law aimed at reducing racial disparities in prison terms for cocaine crimes. The justices ruled 5-4 that trial judges who are asked to resentence inmates may look at a wide range of factors, including some that have nothing to do with crack cocaine offenses that had produced longer stints in prison, disproportionately for people of color. The high court on Monday settled a disagreement among the nation’s appellate courts over what judges should do in these cases.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert