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NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg says war-torn Ukraine will one day become a member of the world’s largest security alliance. It's a commitment that NATO leaders made to Ukraine 14 years ago. But some say it led in part to Russia's invasion. Stoltenberg's remarks came as U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and his NATO counterparts gathered Tuesday in Romania to drum up urgently needed support for Ukraine, including deliveries of electrical components for the war-torn country's devastated power transmission network. Ukraine’s grid has been battered since early October by targeted Russian strikes. Stoltenberg says Russian President Vladimir Putin “is trying to use winter as a weapon of war against Ukraine.”

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An uneasy calm is hanging over Kyiv as residents of the Ukrainian capital did what they could to prepare for expected further Russian missile attacks aiming to take out infrastructure as winter sets in. To ease that pain, NATO allies are making plans to boost provisions of anything from blankets to generators to make sure the 43 million Ukrainians can maintain their resolve in the 10th month of fighting. Ukraine’s grid has been battered countrywide since early October by targeted Russian strikes, in what Western officials call a Russian campaign to weaponize the coming winter cold.

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Residents of Ukraine’s bombed but undaunted capital are taking empty bottles in search of water and crowding into cafés for power and warmth after the latest onslaught of Russian missile strikes. In scenes hard to believe in a city so hip and sophisticated, some Kyiv residents resorted to collecting rainwater from drainpipes, as repair teams labored Thursday to reconnect supplies. Many switched defiantly into survival mode after the latest barrage of missile strikes the previous day plunged the city of 3 million and much of the country into the cold and dark of winter.

Ukrainian authorities say an overnight rocket attack has struck a hospital maternity ward in southern Ukraine, killing a 2-day-old baby. The baby's mother and a doctor were pulled alive Wednesday from the rubble. The region’s governor said the rockets were Russian. The strike in the city of Vilniansk adds to the gruesome toll suffered by hospitals and other medical facilities — and their patients and staff — in the Russian invasion entering its tenth month this week. They have been in the firing line from the outset, including a March 9 airstrike that destroyed a maternity hospital in the now-occupied port city of Mariupol. Ukraine's State Emergency Service said the two-story building was destroyed.

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Residents of the southern Ukrainian city of Kherson can't escape reminders of the terrifying eight months they spent under Russian occupation: missing people, mines everywhere, a scarcity of electricity and water, and explosions day and night as Russian and Ukrainian forces keep battling. Yet despite these hardships, Kherson residents are expressing a mix of relief, optimism, and even joy — not least because of the freedom they regained a week ago to express themselves at all. People are no longer afraid to leave home, or worried that contact with occupying Russian forces might lead to a prison or torture cell. They are gathering in city squares to recharge phones, collect water, and show gratitude to Ukrainian soldiers.

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LOS ANGELES — Horror has been key in helping the film box office recover from a pandemic-induced torpor. The genre, it turns out, might be just as good for live theater. "2:22 — A Ghost Story," which opened at the Ahmanson Theatre this month and runs through Dec. 4, is on pace to be Center Theatre Group's second-bestselling production since the company reopened after the pandemic almost a year ...

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Apple launched a new iPhone feature this week that promises to let users contact emergency dispatchers when cell phone service is unavailable. It functions using a network of satellites orbiting above Earth at 16,000 mph. When CNN tested the tool's reliability, it showed lifesaving potential -- but also revealed some significant caveats.

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Iran’s foreign minister has acknowledged for the first time that his country has supplied Russia with drones, insisting the transfer came before Moscow’s war on Ukraine. The comments on Saturday by Iranian Foreign Minister Hossein Amirabdollahian come after months of confusing messaging from Iran about the weapons shipment, as Russia sends the drones slamming into Ukrainian energy infrastructure and civilian targets. Previously Iranian officials had denied arming Russia in its war on Ukraine. Even so, Iran’s paramilitary Revolutionary Guard has vaguely boasted of providing drones to the world’s top powers. Amirabdollahian told reporters: “We gave a limited number of drones to Russia months before the Ukraine war." He said Iran remained committed to stopping the conflict.

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